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Understanding State Laws for Interchangeable Biosimilars

October 15, 2021
12:40 pm

An important development in the biopharmaceutical world, with significant ramifications for patients, is the progress being made on biosimilars.  These are products with the same safety and efficacy as FDA-approved biologic medications, but potentially less costly for patients.  Below, executives with Cardinal Health, a global manufacturer and distributor of healthcare products and a Healthcare Leadership Council member, discuss the laws governing the interchangeability of biologics and biosimilars and how pharmacists can provide the medication that best meets their patients’ needs.

Understanding State Laws for Interchangeable Biosimilars

by Sonia T. Oskouei, PharmD, BCMAS, DPLA, Vice President, Biosimilars, Cardinal Health and Jeff Baldetti, Director, Biosimilars, Cardinal Health

Earlier this year, the FDA approved Semglee (insulin glargine-yfgn), the first interchangeable biosimilar in the US. The approval represented a significant milestone since the development of the Biologics Price Competition and Innovation Act in 2009 for a few reasons: it is the first interchangeable biosimilar to be approved in the US, it’s the first official biosimilar for an insulin product, and it’s the first biosimilar that will primarily be dispensed in retail pharmacies. With the approval comes the significant opportunity to help expand access to high-quality, lower-cost treatment options for patients with diabetes.

What Are Interchangeable Biosimilars?
Biosimilars are biologic products that are highly similar to, and as safe and effective as, existing FDA-approved biologics. Interchangeability is a regulatory designation that is unique to the US and is achieved through the submission of additional data (which per FDA guidance, may be in the form of switching studies). Interchangeability designation does not denote clinical superiority, as all biosimilars- whether interchangeable or not- meet the FDA’s rigorous regulatory standards for approval.

Why is Interchangeability Important?
The most important aspect of interchangeability is the implication associated with the designation. Interchangeability designation ultimately allows “pharmacist-level substitution,” whereby a pharmacist can automatically substitute the branded biologic with the biosimilar (as done routinely with brand and generics), per state laws. Given these implications, the designation is likely to have the greatest impact on biosimilars dispensed by pharmacists in the retail/specialty pharmacy setting (e.g., products billed under the pharmacy benefit).

Biosimilars are developed with the promise of increasing access and lowering costs for biologic therapies, which represent the most expensive drug category in the world. Interchangeability designation can position pharmacists to further enhance patient accessibility to biologics at a lower cost through automatic substitution authority.

State Pharmacy Laws
Currently, all 50 states and the District of Columbia have laws pertaining to interchangeability; however, pharmacy laws and practices vary from state to state, including requirements related to provider notification/permission, patient communication, and documentation practices. In addition, some states require that interchangeable products can only be swapped if the cost is lower, which adds a need for pharmacists to understand the managed care landscape, including PBM/payer formularies and policies and their impact on patient out-of-pocket costs. With the launch of an interchangeable version of Semglee (insulin glargine-yfgn) expected later this year, plus more interchangeable biosimilars seeking approval, it is critical for pharmacists to understand state requirements and prepare to operationalize these new treatment options.

Resources for Pharmacists
To help pharmacists navigate individual state laws regarding interchangeability, Cardinal Health has created an interactive map that provides pharmacists with key information to help prepare for interchangeability so they’re able to appropriately educate and support their patients with treatment options. The map details how each state defines interchangeability, clarifies the requirements pharmacists must follow to substitute biosimilars, and defines what healthcare providers and pharmacists need to know about switching to a biosimilar.

 

 

 

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